Is Female Education Important? - See 10 Reasons 2

Is Female Education Important? – See 10 Reasons

You must be here trying to find answer to if female education is important. Yes, female education is important. Offering quality and universal education to young girls promotes progress for society as a whole.
The report, Children Still Battling to go to School, finds that 95% of the 28.5 million children not getting a primary school education live in low and lower-middle income countries – 44% in sub-Saharan Africa, 19% in south and west Asia and 14% in the Arab states, UNESCO said. Girls make up 55% of the total and were often the victims of rape and other sexual violence that accompanies armed conflicts, UNESCO said.
Education is the basic right of everyone and therefore while providing education facilities, we should not discriminate among genders or sexes. Unfortunately, this discrimination still prevails in many parts of the world and therefore it is a need to make people understand that women also deserves to be educated and it is their basic right too just like men.
To better understand the far-reaching effects of a few books and a classroom, here are the top 10 reasons why female education is important.

The Importance of Female Education

  1. DECREASE MATERNAL MORTALITY: Educated women (with greater knowledge of health care and fewer pregnancies) are less likely to die during pregnancy, childbirth, or during the postpartum period. Increased education of girls also leads to more female health care providers to assist with prenatal medical care, labor and delivery, delivery complications and emergencies, and follow-up care.
  2. Human Trafficking: Women are most vulnerable to trafficking when they are undereducated and poor, according to the United Nations Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking. Through providing young girls with opportunities and fundamental skills, this billion-dollar industry can be significantly undermined.
  3. Political Representation: Across the globe, women are underrepresented as voters and restricted from political involvement. The United Nations Women’s programs on leadership and participation suggests that civic education, training, and all-around empowerment will ease this gap.
  4. Thriving Babies: According to the United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative, children of educated mothers are twice as likely to survive past the age of five. Foreign aid for schoolhouses and curriculum development could greatly benefit the East African country of Burundi, where nearly 16,000 children die per year.
  5. Safe Sex: A girl who completes primary school is three times less likely to contract HIV. With these statistics in mind, The World Bank calls education a “window of hope” in preventing the spread of AIDS among today’s children.
  6. Later Marriage: As suggested by the United Nations Population Fund, in underdeveloped countries, one in every three girls is married before reaching the age of 18. In a region where a girl receives seven or more years of education, the wedding date is delayed by four years.
  7. Smaller Families: Increased participation in school reduces fertility rates over time. In Mali, women with secondary education or higher have an average of three children. Counterparts with no education have an average of seven children.
  8. Income Potential: Education also empowers a woman’s wallet by boosting her earning capabilities. According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, also known as UNESCO, a single year of primary education has shown to increase a girl’s wages later in life by 20 percent.
  9. Thriving GDP: Gross domestic product also soars when both girls and boys are being offered educational opportunities. When 10 percent more women attend school, GDP increases by three percent on average.
  10. Poverty Reduction: When women are provided with equal rights and equal access to education, they go on to participate in business and economic activity. Increased earning power and income combat against current and future poverty through feeding, clothing and providing for entire families.
The sustainability and progress of all regions depend on the success of women across the globe. As President Obama said while addressing the United Nations General Assembly in 2012;
The future must not belong to those who bully women. It must be shaped by girls who go to school and those who stand for a world where our daughters can live their dreams just like our sons.

In Conclusion

Education and knowledge are, by far, the most powerful weapons known to mankind. It is a fundamental factor in being able to make a valuable and substantial difference in the world.

This is not to say that more girls should be provided with an education than boys. Rather, it is a reminder to recognise the importance of equality across both genders – especially in communities where women are seen as the weaker gender.

One reason for such gender stereotyping could be the stronger physical attributes of a male. However, it could be argued that women are more emotionally and intellectually advanced, able to nurture a family or community singlehandedly. Education should, therefore, be accessible to both males and females in equal measure.

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